Skip to main content



Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

Browse or Search All Past CMRL Messages

Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages (10,000+). The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - August 4, 2022 and is updated quarterly.

Instructions: Postings are listed for browsing with the newest messages first. Click on the linked ID number to see a message. You can search the author, subject, message ID, and message content fields by entering your criteria into this search box:

Message ID: 10940
Date: 2021-06-11

Author:Duprey, Erinn K

Subject:Join us for a FREE Webinar on June 24th: Early Life Adversity and Adolescent Development: A Focus on Brain Development and Substance Use

Join the conversation on May June 24th! The TRANSFORM Research Center invites you and those in your organization to join us for this free webinar. Please spread the word. Below are event details and registration information: Early Life Adversity and Adolescent Development: A Focus on Brain Development and Substance Use Thursday, 6/24/2021 - 12:00- 1:00 PM ET Caregiving deprivation and maltreatment during childhood have impacts on adolescent development, including neural and behavioral development. This talk will review what has been discovered in research examining the impact of institutional orphanage care and child maltreatment on brain development and the development of substance use and disorder. These findings will then be discussed in the context of adolescence and how this developmental period is a crucial time of risk and opportunity following early life adversity. Register for live event (link and materials will also be sent post event) Register to receive recording link and materials (will not attend live) Speakers: Max Herzberg, Ph.D. is a post-doctoral research scholar in the Department of Psychiatry at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. He completed his undergraduate degree in Psychology at Grinnell College and received a Ph.D. in developmental psychology from the Institute of Child Development at the University of Minnesota. Elizabeth Handley, Ph.D. is Director of Research at Mt. Hope Family Center and an Assistant Professor at the University of Rochester. Dr. Handley’s research is grounded in the developmental psychopathology framework and explores multilevel and transactional risk and protective mechanisms of development among at-risk children and families. The University of Rochester is committed to providing inclusive experiences and equal access to programs, services, and meetings. If you anticipate needing any type of communication access (ASL interpreting, closed captioning) please contact Corey Nichols-Hadeed at Corey_nichols@urmc.rochester.edu . In all situations, a good faith effort will be made to provide accommodations. If you are interested in learning more about the work of our individual collaborative organizations, visit the following websites: Mt. Hope Family Center Education Development Center Institute for Translational Research in Children's Mental Health Susan B. Anthony Center at the University of Rochester Recordings of previous webinars can be found on our website: www.thetransformcenter.org/events Contact Us! www.thetransformcenter.org Twitter: @TheTRANSFORMctr Email: TRANSFORM@urmc.rochester.edu

Join the conversation on May June 24th! The TRANSFORM Research Center invites you and those in your organization to join us for this free webinar. Please spread the word. Below are event details and registration information: Early Life Adversity and Adolescent Development: A Focus on Brain Development and Substance Use Thursday, 6/24/2021 - 12:00- 1:00 PM ET Caregiving deprivation and maltreatment during childhood have impacts on adolescent development, including neural and behavioral development. This talk will review what has been discovered in research examining the impact of institutional orphanage care and child maltreatment on brain development and the development of substance use and disorder. These findings will then be discussed in the context of adolescence and how this developmental period is a crucial time of risk and opportunity following early life adversity. Register for live event (link and materials will also be sent post event) Register to receive recording link and materials (will not attend live) Speakers: Max Herzberg, Ph.D. is a post-doctoral research scholar in the Department of Psychiatry at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. He completed his undergraduate degree in Psychology at Grinnell College and received a Ph.D. in developmental psychology from the Institute of Child Development at the University of Minnesota. Elizabeth Handley, Ph.D. is Director of Research at Mt. Hope Family Center and an Assistant Professor at the University of Rochester. Dr. Handley’s research is grounded in the developmental psychopathology framework and explores multilevel and transactional risk and protective mechanisms of development among at-risk children and families. The University of Rochester is committed to providing inclusive experiences and equal access to programs, services, and meetings. If you anticipate needing any type of communication access (ASL interpreting, closed captioning) please contact Corey Nichols-Hadeed at Corey_nicholsurmc.rochester.edu . In all situations, a good faith effort will be made to provide accommodations. If you are interested in learning more about the work of our individual collaborative organizations, visit the following websites: Mt. Hope Family Center Education Development Center Institute for Translational Research in Children's Mental Health Susan B. Anthony Center at the University of Rochester Recordings of previous webinars can be found on our website: www.thetransformcenter.org/events Contact Us! www.thetransformcenter.org Twitter: TheTRANSFORMctr Email: TRANSFORMurmc.rochester.edu